Dialogue No.1

Booking a room in a hotel:

Mr. Brown is talking to the receptionist (R) at a hotel.

R: Hotel Metro pole. Can I help you?

Mr. Brown: oh, good morning .I’d like to book a double room with a bathroom for May 24th, please.

R: that’s fine. All our bedrooms are en suite.

Mr. Brown: Right and how much is that?

R: It’s $60 a night, and breakfast is included in the price.

Mr. Brown: that’s great. And has the hotel got parking?

R: No, I’m afraid not.

Mr. Brown:  oh, what a shame. Ok, well, never mind. I’ll take it.

R: Right, can I have your credit card details please?

Dialogue No. 2

Booking a room in a hotel:

A: Fairway Hotel. Can I help you?

B: Hello, I would like a room for tonight. Friday, August 15th.

A: What kind of room would you like?

B: I’d like a single room, please.

A: Hold on, please…. I’m afraid all our single rooms are reserved. The only room we have available is a twin.

B: How much for the twin room?

A: Sixty dollars including tax.

B: Does that include breakfast?

A: No, but breakfast is available in our dining room.

B: OK, I’ll take a room for tonight (only).

A: I’ll need to get your credit card information to guarantee your room….

Dialogue No. 3

Checking in:

A: Hi, my name is Suzuki and I have a reservation for tonight.

B: Let me check. OK, yes. A twin room for one night.

A: That’s right.

B: You are in room 408. How would you like to pay for the room?

A: Do you take American Express Travelers Checks?

B: Certainly, are they in American funds?

A: No, in Canadian. Is that OK?

B: Yes, no problem. With the exchange, that comes to 83.76 dollars Canadian.

A: Do I pay now or when I check out.

B: In advance, please.

A: Here you go.

B: The elevator is just around the corner. Do you need any help with your bags?

A: No thanks. I can manage myself.

B: Is there anything else we can do to help you enjoy your stay?

A: Can you give me a wake-up call at 7:00?

B: We don’t do that from here. You can use the clock radio in the room, or you can program the telephone in your room to ring at 7:00.

A: Oh, yes. I have a meeting downtown tomorrow. Does this hotel have a shuttle bus?

B: No, I’m afraid we don’t, but we will be happy to call a taxi for you if you provide us

with the details.

A: No, that won’t be necessary. I can call from my room.

B: There are no charges for local calls.

Dialogue No. 4

Calling the front desk:

B: Front desk.

A: Hi, I’m in 408 and my TV doesn’t seem to be working.

B: We will send someone up to take a look at it in a few minutes.

How is everything else?

A: Everything else with the room is great. Do the rooms come equipped with irons?

B: No, but they are available free of charge here at the front desk.

A: Can you send it up with the person who is going to look at my TV?

B: Certainly. Tom should be up there by 2:00.

A: Thanks. What should I do with the iron when I’m finished?

B: You can keep it in your room. If you don’t hear back from me before 9 tonight,

just leave it on your desk and the cleaning staff will pick it up in the morning.

A: OK, thanks for everything.

B: Enjoy your stay, and don’t hesitate to call if there is something else I can do for you.

Dialogue No. 5

Booking a room in a hotel

Receptionist: Good morning. Welcome to the Grand Woodward Hotel.

Client: Hi, good morning. I’d like to make a reservation for the third weekend in September. Do you have any vacancies?
R: Yes sir, we have several rooms available for that particular weekend. And what is the exact date of your arrival?
C: The 24th.
R: How long will you be staying?
C: I’ll be staying for two nights.
R: How many people is the reservation for?
C: There will be two of us.
R: And would you like a room with twin beds or a double bed?
C: A double bed, please.
R: Great. And would you prefer to have a room with a view of the ocean?
C: If that type of room is available, I would love to have an ocean view. What’s the rate for the room?
R: Your room is five hundred and ninety dollars per night. Now what name will the reservation be listed under?
C: Charles Hannighan.
R: Could you spell your last name for me, please?
C: Sure. H-A-N-N-I-G-H-A-N
R: And is there a phone number where you can be contacted?
C: Yes, my cell phone number is 555-26386.
R: Great. Now I’ll need your credit card information to reserve the room for you. What type of card is it?
C: Visa. The number is 987654321.
R: And what is the name of the cardholder?
C: Charles H. Hannighan.
R: Alright, Mr. Hannighan, your reservation has been made for the twenty-fourth of September for a room with a double bed and view of the ocean. Check-in is at 2 o’clock. If you have any other questions, please do not hesitate to call us.
C: Great, thank you so much.
R: My pleasure. We’ll see you in September, Mr. Hannighan. Have a nice day.

Dialogue No.6

Checking in

Hotel: Good afternoon. Welcome to the Grand Woodward Hotel. How may I help you?
Guest: I have a reservation for today. It’s under the name of Hannighan.
Hotel: Can you please spell that for me, sir?
Guest: Sure. H-A-N-N-I-G-H-A-N.
Hotel: Yes, Mr. Hannighan, we’ve reserved a double room for you with a view of the ocean for two nights. Is that correct?
Guest: Yes, it is.
Hotel: Excellent. We already have your credit card information on file. If you’ll just sign the receipt along the bottom, please.
Guest: Whoa! Five hundred and ninety dollars a night!
Hotel: Yes, sir. We are a five star hotel after all.
Guest: Well, fine. I’m here on business anyway, so at least I’m staying on the company’s dime. What’s included in this cost anyway?
Hotel: A full Continental buffet every morning, free airport shuttle service, and use of the hotel’s safe are all included.
Guest: So what’s not included in the price?
Hotel: Well, you will find a mini-bar in your room. Use of it will be charged to your account. Also, the hotel provides room service, at an additional charge of course.
Guest: Hmm. Ok, so what room am I in?
Hotel: Room 487. Here is your key. To get to your room, take the elevator on the right up to the fourth floor. Turn left once you exit the elevator and your room will be on the left hand side. A bellboy will bring your bags up shortly.
Guest: Great. Thanks.
Hotel: Should you have any questions or requests, please dial ‘O’ from your room. Also, there is internet available in the lobby 24 hours a day.
Guest: Ok, and what time is check-out?
Hotel: At midday, sir.
Guest: Ok, thanks.
Hotel: My pleasure, sir. Have a wonderful stay at the Grand Woodward Hotel.

 

Dialogue No. 7

Check-out/ Getting to the airport

Hotel: Did you enjoy your stay with us?
Guest: Yes, very much so. However, I now need to get to the airport. I have a flight that leaves in about two hours, so what is the quickest way to get there?
Hotel: We do have a free airport shuttle service.
Guest: That sounds great, but will it get me to the airport on time?
Hotel: Yes, it should. The next shuttle leaves in 15 minutes, and it takes approximately 25 minutes to get to the airport.
Guest: Fantastic. I’ll just wait in the lounge area. Will you please let me know when it will be leaving?
Hotel: Of course, sir. Oh, before you go would you be able to settle the mini-bar bill?
Guest: Oh yes certainly. How much will that be?
Hotel: Let’s see. The bill comes to $17.50. How would you like to pay for that?
Guest: I’ll pay with my Visa thanks, but I’ll need a receipt so I can charge it to my company.
Hotel: Absolutely. Here we are sir. If you like you can leave your bags with the porter and he can load them onto the shuttle for you when it arrives.
Guest: That would be great thank you.
Hotel: Would you like to sign the hotel guestbook too while you wait?
Guest: Sure, I had a really good stay here and I’ll tell other people to come here.
Hotel: That’s good to hear. Thank you again for staying at The Grand Woodward Hotel.

Describing a hotel:

We stayed in a hotel near the sea where we had a beautiful bedroom with good facilities such as: mini-bar, internet access, satellite, TV and air conditioning. The hotel has a great gym, there was 24 hour room service and the staff were very helpful with tourist information. The cafe bar was a very pleasant place to meet other guests, and we had a delicious breakfast there too. We recommend this hotel for a short stay.

Common idioms, proverbs, phrases and vocabulary words:

A bedroom that is meant to be used by one person only.

Single room

A room that contains 2 single beds.

Twin room

A place where you report your arrival at an airport, hotel, hospital, etc.

Check in

A place where you pay.

Check out

The desk where visitors go when they arrive at a hotel.

Front desk

A room in a hotel or building that is not being used and is available for someone to stay in.

vacancies

It makes regular short journeys between two places.

Shuttle service

One of a single beds in a room for two people.

Twin beds

A bed made for two people to sleep in.

A double bed

Someone whose job is to carry people’s bags at airport, etc.

porter

Live for a short time in a hotel.

Stay in a hotel

Things you can use, e.g. internet, gym.

facilities

When a waiter brings food or drink to your room.

Room service

Say something is good.

recommend

Ask a hotel to keep a room for you for a future date.

Book a room

A bedroom with a bathroom.

En suite

If breakfast is included, you don’t pay for it.

included

It’s not important

Never mind

Dialogue No.4

In a Hotel:

Receptionist: Hi, how may I help you?

Visitor: I would like a room for tonight.

Receptionist: Just one night?

Visitor: Yes.

Receptionist: OK, here is your keycard. Your room number is 210. Have a nice night.

Visitor: Thank you.

Dialogue No.5

Receptionist: Hello! Welcome to the Plaza Hotel. How may I help you?

Visitor: I would like to get a room for two people. We have a reservation for a double room under Jack Brown.

Receptionist: OK, would you like a single room?

Visitor: Yes, that would be fine.

Receptionist: Your room number is 103 and here is your keycard.

Visitor: Thank you.

Dialogue No.6

Room Service:

Room Service:  Room service. How may I help you?

Guest:  Good morning. This is Miss Smith in room 113. I’d like some breakfast, please.

Room Service: Alright, what would you like?

Guest: I’d like some grapefruit juice, two scrambled eggs with bacon and some toast and black coffee, please.

Room Service: Alright.

Guest: How long will it take?

Room Service: About 15 minutes.

Guest:  Great. Thank you.

Dialogue No.7

At the Airport:
Checking in:

Agent: Hello, where are you flying today?

Passenger: I am flying to San Francisco.

Agent: May I please see your passport?

Passenger: Here you are.

Agent: Will you be checking any luggage?

Passenger: Yes, I have two suitcases.

Agent: Do you have any carry-ons?

Passenger: Yes, my brief case and my laptop bag.

Agent: Do you want a window seat or an aisle seat?

Passenger: I would like a window seat.

Agent: Here is your boarding pass and your gate is A13.  Have a pleasant flight.

Dialogue No. 8

In Flight:

Flight attendant: Would you like something to drink?

Passenger: I would like a coke.

Flight attendant: Would you like a snack?

Passenger: Sure. I would like some peanuts.

Flight attendant: Would you like chicken or beef?

Passenger: I would like chicken.

Flight attendant: Would you like something to drink?

Passenger: I would like some orange juice.

Passenger: Excuse me. May I get a blanket?

Flight attendant: Sure. I will be right back.

Passenger: May I have a pack of cards?

Flight attendant: Sorry, we don’t have any available right now.

Passenger: Excuse me. Do you have any medicine for a stomachache?

Flight attendant: Yes, we do. I can get you some.

Flight attendant: Do you have a US passport or a green card?

Passenger: No, I don’t have either.

Flight attendant: Please fill out this immigration form and the claim form for your luggage.

Passenger: Can you help me fill this out?

Flight attendant: Sure, no problem.

Dialogue No.9

Arriving- Customs:

Customs Agent: May I see your passport please?

Passenger: Here you are.

Customs Agent: How long are you staying in America?

Passenger: Two weeks.

Customs Agent: What is the purpose of your visit?

Passenger: I am here sightseeing.

Customs Agent: Here you are. Welcome to America.

Passenger: Thank you.

Dialogue No.10

Airport Dialogues – Security

Security Guard: Hello, do you have anything metal on you? Any change in your wallet, watches, jewelry?

Passenger: No.

Security Guard: Do you have any liquids or gels?

Passenger: I have this water bottle.

Security Guard: Is it less than 100 milliliters?

Passenger: No, it is 500.

Security Guard: I’m sorry you will have to throw it away.

Passenger: Oh, alright.

Security Guard: Please place your jacket and carry-on in the tray and proceed through the metal detector.

Dialogue No.11

Information Desk at the airport

Person: Hi, can you help me?

Information Desk Person: I’d be glad to.

Person: Where can I get a taxi?

Information Desk Person: The taxis are by the main entrance. From here, walk towards Gate 32, take the escalator to the first floor and turn right. Outside, you will see the taxis.

Person: Thank you very much.

Dialogue No.12

Currency Exchange:

Bank clerk:  Hi! How may I help?

Passenger:  I would like to exchange NT dollars into US dollars.

Bank clerk: OK.

Passenger: Can I have your smallest bills?

Bank clerk: Yes. I would give you as many as I can.

Passenger: Thank you.

Bank clerk: Please write your phone number and sign here.

Passenger: OK.

Bank clerk: Here you are. Have a nice day.

Dialogue No.13

New York Avenue:
Police Station:

Child: Excuse me, officer. Can you help me?

Police Officer: What’s your emergency?

Child: I’m lost. I need to call my mom.

Police Officer: OK. Do you know her phone number?

Child: Yes, it’s 555-6789

Dialogue No.14

Ask somebody for direction:

Person: Excuse me officer, could you please tell me how to get to the Plaza Hotel?

Police Officer: Yes, I can. You can go straight down First Street. Turn right when you get to the intersection.  And the hotel will be on your left.

Person: Thank you, officer.

Dialogue No.15

I can ask for and give directions:

Person: excuse me. How do I get to the museum from here?

Police Officer: Go along here and take the second turning on the left.

Person: excuse me. Do you know the way to the railway station?

Police Officer: Go along here and turn right. It’s opposite the bank.

Person: Excuse me. Is there a post office near here?

Police Officer: yes, it’s the third turning on the right. There is a post office on the corner.

Dialogue No.16

Out of town:

Beth (B) and Marco (M) are talking.

M: how far is it from London to Bath?

B: It’s about 115 miles. That’s 185 kilometers.

M: And what’s the best way to get there?

B: Right. Take the M4 motorway from London. At junction 18, take the A46. It’s 10 miles from here.

M: Thanks. And what’s the speed limit on motorways here?

B: 70 miles an hour. That’s about 110 kilometers an hour.

M: Ok. And are they very busy?

B: Yes and you get traffic jams in the rush hour especially when there is an accident.

M: But you still use the motorway?

B: Yes, because there are three lanes on most motorways in Britain, so it’s easy to overtake. Oh. And Marco, remember to drive on the left!

I can communicate in an airport:

When passengers get to the airport, they put their luggage (suitcase and bag) on a trolley and go to the check in desk. There they show their ticket and passport, and put their luggage on the scales. They can take hand luggage on the plane with them. The person at the check in desk often asks, “Do you want a window seat or an aisle seat?” they give the passenger a boarding card, and they often say, “have a good flight.”   s an accident.

Common idioms, proverbs, phrases and vocabulary words:

A special plastic card that you put in an electronic lock to open a door etc.

Key card

Eggs cooked in a pan after the white and yellow parts have been mixed together.

 

Scrambled eggs

Salted or smoked meat from the back or sides of a pig, often served in narrow thin pieces.

 

Bacon

 Dark brown drink without milk.

Black coffee

A bag that you are allowed to take onto a plane with you.

 

Carry – on

A seat next to the window

Window seat

A long passage between rows of seats in a church, plane, theatre etc. or between rows of shelves in a shop.

Aisle

The place where you leave an airport to get on a plane.

Gate

To write all the necessary information on an official document.

Fill out

To put something in a particular situation.

Place your jacket

A flat open container with four sides used for holding certain things.

 

Tray

A special frame that you walk through at an airport, used to check for weapons made of metal.

 

Metal detector

Happy

Glad

A set of moving stairs that take people to different levels in a building.

 

Escalator

An unexpected and dangerous situation that must be dealt with immediately.

Emergency

How many kilometers or miles is it?

How far is it?

Go on to and travel on the M4.

Take the M4

A large fast road between towns.

Motorway

The fastest speed you are

Speed limit

A busy road has a lot of cars in it.

Busy

The time when a lot of people are travelling to and from work.

Rush hour

Pass another car by going faster.

Overtake

Go somewhere in your car.

                                                                                  Drive

Passenger

The cases, bags etc. that you carry when you are travelling

Luggage

A large basket on wheels that you use for carrying bags, shopping etc.

Trolley

A machine for weighing people or objects.

Scales

The small bags that you carry with you when you are traveling on a plane.

Hand luggage

An official card that you have to show before you get onto a plane.

Boarding card

Dialogue No.17

AIRPORT (at the check in clerk)

Check- in Clerk: Good morning.

Passenger: Oh, good morning.

Check in Clerk: Could I see your ticket, please?

Passenger: What? Oh yes, er…..sorry. Here you are.

Check-in Clerk: Thank you Mr. Robinson.

Passenger: I was wondering, er….Could I have a smoking seat, please?

Check in clerk: I´m afraid this is a non- smoking flight, sir. Would you prefer an aisle seat or a window seat?

Passenger: Erm….well, I´m not sure. You see, it´s the first time I´ve flown and I, well, I´m feeling a bit uneasy about it. What I really want is the safest seat.

Check in clerk: Oh I see, well there´s really nothing to worry about. Let´s see, I can give you an aisle seat right next to one of the exits. Then you´ll have more leg room, too.

Passenger: Oh good. OH, well that sounds all right

Check in clerk: And could I just see your passport, please?

Passenger: Um…..oh yes….um….here you are…….

Today we’re going to go through the airport step by step, learning important vocabulary and useful
Phrases along the way. Let’s imagine you’re flying from New York City to Los
Angeles.

Situation 1:

At the check-in desk

Agent: Good afternoon! Where are you flying to today? 

You: Los Angeles.

Agent: May I have your passport, please?

You: Here you go.

Agent: Are you checking any bags?

You: Just this one.

Agent: OK, please place your bag on the scale.

You: I have a stopover in Chicago – do I need to pick up my luggage there?

Agent: No, it’ll go straight through to Los Angeles. Here are your boarding passes.

Your flight leaves from gate 15A and it’ll begin boarding at 3:20. Your seat number is

26E.

You: Thanks.

Common phrases and vocabulary words:

 Instead of “Where are you flying today?” the agent may ask “What’s your final destination?” The answer will be the same!

You can say “Here you go” when you give something to somebody, as in this example when you give the passport to the agent.

Check your bags means: to put the bags on the airplane inside the cargo compartment.

The small bag you take with you on the airplane is called a carry-on. You need to put your carry-on bags through the X-ray machine at security.

The scale is the equipment that tells you the weight of your luggage. (for example, 45 kilograms)

A stopover or layover is when the airplane stops in a different city before continuing to the final destination.

If the agent says that your luggage will go straight through, it means it will go directly to the final destination and you don’t need to pick it up during your stopover.

Boarding passes are the tickets that permit you to enter the airplane.

When a plane begins boarding, it means that the passengers start to enter the plane. Usually boarding time is 30-60 minutes before takeoff (when the plane leaves)

Extra Tips and Suggestions:

 If you don’t know where the check-in desk is, you can ask an airport employee, “Excuse me, where is the Delta check-in desk?” or, “Excuse me, where is the American Airlines check-in desk?”

If your bag is heavier than the weight limits, or if your bag is larger than the size limits, you may need to pay an oversized baggage fee or overweight baggage fee. Some airlines in the United States also charge a fee for ALL checked bags.

If you have fragile or sensitive items in your bag that might break, you can ask the agent, “Please mark this bag as ‘fragile.’”

If you want to ask if the flight will leave at the correct time, you can say, “Is the flight on time?” The agent will respond either “Yes” if the flight is on the correct schedule, or “There’s a 20-minute delay” (for example) if the flight will leave later than expected.

Extra questions in the U.S.

On flights going to or inside the U.S., you will probably be asked some extra security questions before or during check-in. Here are some sample questions and the correct responses:

Agent: Did you pack your bags yourself?

You: Yes.

Agent: Are you carrying any firearms or flammable materials?

You: No.

Agent: Has your luggage been in your possession at all times?

You: Yes.

*Be careful here – some agents ask if your luggage has been “in your possession at all times” and others ask if your luggage has been “outside your supervision (or possession) at any time.” The answer to the first question is YES and the answer to the second question would be NO.

Agent: Has anyone given you anything to carry on the flight?

You: No.

Agent: Are you aware of the regulations regarding liquids in your carry-on, which must be 3.4 ounces or less and placed inside a single quart-sized transparent plastic bag?

You: Yes.

* If you want to take any liquids on a flight in the United States, they must be 3.4 ounces (100 milliliters) or less and you must put them all in a clear (transparent) plastic bag. Each passenger can take only one bag on the plane. If you have bigger bottles of liquid (like shampoo, wine, etc.) you need to put them into your checked bag.

Situation 2:

Going through security

There are two pieces of equipment in security: you put your bags through the X-ray machine, and you walk through the metal detector. The X-ray machine has a conveyor belt that moves your bags automatically through the machine. You can put small items like keys or money into plastic bins.

Agent: Please lay your bags flat on the conveyor belt, and use the bins for small objects.

You: Do I need to take my laptop out of the bag?

Agent: Yes, you do. Take off your hat and your shoes, too.

(You walk through the metal detector)

[BEEP BEEP BEEP BEEP]

Agent: Please step back. Do you have anything in your pockets – keys, cell phone, and loose change?

You: I don’t think so. Let me try taking off my belt.

Agent: Okay, come on through.

(You go through the metal detector again)

Agent: You’re all set! Have a nice flight.

The phrase “you’re all set” is a common expression that means “you’re finished and everything is OK.”

Phrasal Verb focus:

SET OFF and GO OFF

When the alarm sounds, we say “the alarm went off.” To describe what caused the alarm to sound, we say “set off” – for example, “My keys set off the alarm” or “My keys set off the metal detector.”

Situation 3:

At the gate

Airports are divided into terminals (the major sections of the airport) and each terminal has many gates. The gate is the door you go through to enter the airplane.

Here are a few announcements you might hear while you are at the gate, waiting for the plane to board.

“Attention passengers of United Airlines flight 880. There has been a gate change. United Airlines flight 880 will now be leaving from gate 12.”

Travel Tip:

Know your flight number in English, so that you can pay attention to the announcement and know if you need to go to a different gate.

“United Airlines flight 880 to Miami is now boarding.” (This means it’s time for passengers to enter the plane)

“We would like to invite our first- and business-class passengers, Star Club Premium members, and passengers requiring special assistance to board at gate 12.” (This means that passengers who are “special” (first class, business class, or in the Star Club) or passengers who are elderly (old), disabled, pregnant, or with small children can go into the airplane first.)

“We would now like to invite all passengers seated in Zone 2 – that’s rows 16 -35 – to begin boarding United Airlines flight 880 at gate 12.” (Look at your boarding pass to know your “zone number” and what “row” your seat number is)  

“We would now like to invite all passengers to board United Airlines flight 880 to Miami at gate 12.”

 (This means everyone can enter the plane)

“This is the last call for United Airlines flight 880 to Miami, now boarding at gate number 12.”

 (This means it is the FINAL OPPORTUNITY to enter the plane before they close the doors)

“Passenger John Smith. Passenger John Smith, please proceed to the United Airlines desk at gate 12.”

 (Sometimes the announcement will call a specific passenger by name. The word “proceed” in this context is a formal way to say “go.”)

Situation 4:

On the plane

The people who work inside the airplane serving food and drinks are called flight attendants. Both men and women who have this job are called flight attendants. Here’s a conversation you might have on the plane.

Flight attendant: Chicken or pasta?

You: Sorry?

Flight attendant: Would you like chicken or pasta?

You: I’ll have the chicken.

Flight attendant: Anything to drink?

You: What kind of soda do you have?

Flight attendant: Coke, Diet Coke, Sprite, Orange, and Dr. Pepper.

You: A Diet Coke, no ice, please.

Flight attendant: Here you go.

You: Thanks.

Conversation Tips:

 If you didn’t understand what the flight attendant said, you can say

Sorry? Or Pardon? To ask him or her to repeat it.

 If you want to ask for something, you can use the phrase “Can I have…” For example: Can I have a blanket?

Can I have a pair of headphones? (Or: Can I have a headset?) Can I have some water? Can I have some extra napkins? Can I have a decaf coffee?

There are two types of coffee: regular coffee, which has caffeine. This is the type of coffee that helps keep you awake. There is also Decaf coffee – this is short for “decaffeinated coffee” – and this type has no caffeine. It’s good to drink decaf coffee if you like the taste of coffee, but you want to go to sleep soon.

Finally, if you need to stand up, but there is a person sitting between you and the aisle, you can say Excuse me and make a motion to start standing up. The person sitting next to you will understand and stand up to let you get out of your seat.

Visitor: Thank you.

Dialogue No.6

Room Service:

Room Service:  Room service. How may I help you?

Guest:  Good morning. This is Miss Smith in room 113. I’d like some breakfast, please.

Room Service: Alright, what would you like?

Guest: I’d like some grapefruit juice, two scrambled eggs with bacon and some toast and black coffee, please.

Room Service: Alright.

Guest: How long will it take?

Room Service: About 15 minutes.

Guest:  Great. Thank you.

Dialogue No.7

At the Airport:
Checking in:

Agent: Hello, where are you flying today?

Passenger: I am flying to San Francisco.

Agent: May I please see your passport?

Passenger: Here you are.

Agent: Will you be checking any luggage?

Passenger: Yes, I have two suitcases.

Agent: Do you have any carry-ons?

Passenger: Yes, my brief case and my laptop bag.

Agent: Do you want a window seat or an aisle seat?

Passenger: I would like a window seat.

Agent: Here is your boarding pass and your gate is A13.  Have a pleasant flight.

Dialogue No. 8

In Flight:

Flight attendant: Would you like something to drink? 

Passenger: I would like a coke.

Flight attendant: Would you like a snack?

Passenger: Sure. I would like some peanuts.

Flight attendant: Would you like chicken or beef?

Passenger: I would like chicken.

Flight attendant: Would you like something to drink?

Passenger: I would like some orange juice.

Passenger: Excuse me. May I get a blanket?

Flight attendant: Sure. I will be right back.

Passenger: May I have a pack of cards?

Flight attendant: Sorry, we don’t have any available right now.

Passenger: Excuse me. Do you have any medicine for a stomachache?

Flight attendant: Yes, we do. I can get you some.

Flight attendant: Do you have a US passport or a green card?

Passenger: No, I don’t have either.

Flight attendant: Please fill out this immigration form and the claim form for your luggage.

Passenger: Can you help me fill this out?

Flight attendant: Sure, no problem.

Dialogue No.9

Arriving- Customs:

Customs Agent: May I see your passport please?

Passenger: Here you are.

Customs Agent: How long are you staying in America?

Passenger: Two weeks.

Customs Agent: What is the purpose of your visit?

Passenger: I am here sightseeing.

Customs Agent: Here you are. Welcome to America.

Passenger: Thank you.

Dialogue No.10

Airport Dialogues – Security

Security Guard: Hello, do you have anything metal on you? Any change in your wallet, watches, jewelry?

Passenger: No.

Security Guard: Do you have any liquids or gels?

Passenger: I have this water bottle.

Security Guard: Is it less than 100 milliliters?

Passenger: No, it is 500.

Security Guard: I’m sorry you will have to throw it away.

Passenger: Oh, alright.

Security Guard: Please place your jacket and carry-on in the tray and proceed through the metal detector.

Dialogue No.11

Information Desk at the airport

Person: Hi, can you help me?

Information Desk Person: I’d be glad to.

Person: Where can I get a taxi?

Information Desk Person: The taxis are by the main entrance. From here, walk towards Gate 32, take the escalator to the first floor and turn right. Outside, you will see the taxis.

Person: Thank you very much.

Dialogue No.12

Currency Exchange:

Bank clerk:  Hi! How may I help?

Passenger:  I would like to exchange NT dollars into US dollars.

Bank clerk: OK.

Passenger: Can I have your smallest bills?

Bank clerk: Yes. I would give you as many as I can.

Passenger: Thank you.

Bank clerk: Please write your phone number and sign here.

Passenger: OK.

Bank clerk: Here you are. Have a nice day.

Dialogue No.13

New York Avenue:
Police Station:

Child: Excuse me, officer. Can you help me?

Police Officer: What’s your emergency?

Child: I’m lost. I need to call my mom.

Police Officer: OK. Do you know her phone number?

Child: Yes, it’s 555-6789

Dialogue No.14

Ask somebody for direction:

Person: Excuse me officer, could you please tell me how to get to the Plaza Hotel?

Police Officer: Yes, I can. You can go straight down First Street. Turn right when you get to the intersection.  And the hotel will be on your left.

Person: Thank you, officer.

Dialogue No.15

I can ask for and give directions:

Person: excuse me. How do I get to the museum from here?

Police Officer: Go along here and take the second turning on the left.

Person: excuse me. Do you know the way to the railway station?

Police Officer: Go along here and turn right. It’s opposite the bank.

Person: Excuse me. Is there a post office near here?

Police Officer: yes, it’s the third turning on the right. There is a post office on the corner.

Dialogue No.16

Out of town:

Beth (B) and Marco (M) are talking.

M: how far is it from London to Bath?

B: It’s about 115 miles. That’s 185 kilometers.

M: And what’s the best way to get there?

B: Right. Take the M4 motorway from London. At junction 18, take the A46. It’s 10 miles from here.

M: Thanks. And what’s the speed limit on motorways here?

B: 70 miles an hour. That’s about 110 kilometers an hour.

M: Ok. And are they very busy?

B: Yes and you get traffic jams in the rush hour especially when there is an accident.

M: But you still use the motorway?

B: Yes, because there are three lanes on most motorways in Britain, so it’s easy to overtake. Oh. And Marco, remember to drive on the left!

I can communicate in an airport:

When passengers get to the airport, they put their luggage (suitcase and bag) on a trolley and go to the check in desk. There they show their ticket and passport, and put their luggage on the scales. They can take hand luggage on the plane with them. The person at the check in desk often asks, “Do you want a window seat or an aisle seat?” they give the passenger a boarding card, and they often say, “have a good flight.”   s an accident.

Common idioms, proverbs, phrases and vocabulary words:

A special plastic card that you put in an electronic lock to open a door etc.

Key card

Eggs cooked in a pan after the white and yellow parts have been mixed together.

 

Scrambled eggs

Salted or smoked meat from the back or sides of a pig, often served in narrow thin pieces.

 

Bacon

 Dark brown drink without milk.

Black coffee

A bag that you are allowed to take onto a plane with you.

 

Carry – on

A seat next to the window

Window seat

A long passage between rows of seats in a church, plane, theatre etc. or between rows of shelves in a shop.

Aisle

The place where you leave an airport to get on a plane.

Gate

To write all the necessary information on an official document.

Fill out

To put something in a particular situation.

Place your jacket

A flat open container with four sides used for holding certain things.

 

Tray

A special frame that you walk through at an airport, used to check for weapons made of metal.

 

Metal detector

Happy

Glad

A set of moving stairs that take people to different levels in a building.

 

Escalator

An unexpected and dangerous situation that must be dealt with immediately.

Emergency

How many kilometers or miles is it?

How far is it?

Go on to and travel on the M4.

Take the M4

A large fast road between towns.

Motorway

The fastest speed you are

Speed limit

A busy road has a lot of cars in it.

Busy

The time when a lot of people are travelling to and from work.

Rush hour

Pass another car by going faster.

Overtake

Go somewhere in your car.

                                                                                 Drive

 

Passenger

The cases, bags etc. that you carry when you are travelling

Luggage

A large basket on wheels that you use for carrying bags, shopping etc.

Trolley

A machine for weighing people or objects.

Scales

The small bags that you carry with you when you are traveling on a plane.

Hand luggage

An official card that you have to show before you get onto a plane.

Boarding card

 

Dialogue No.17

 

AIRPORT (at the check in clerk)

Check- in Clerk: Good morning.

Passenger: Oh, good morning.

Check in Clerk: Could I see your ticket, please?

Passenger: What? Oh yes, er…..sorry. Here you are.

Check-in Clerk: Thank you Mr. Robinson.

Passenger: I was wondering, er….Could I have a smoking seat, please?

Check in clerk: I´m afraid this is a non- smoking flight, sir. Would you prefer an aisle seat or a window seat?

Passenger: Erm….well, I´m not sure. You see, it´s the first time I´ve flown and I, well, I´m feeling a bit uneasy about it. What I really want is the safest seat.

Check in clerk: Oh I see, well there´s really nothing to worry about. Let´s see, I can give you an aisle seat right next to one of the exits. Then you´ll have more leg room, too.

Passenger: Oh good. OH, well that sounds all right

Check in clerk: And could I just see your passport, please?

Passenger: Um…..oh yes….um….here you are…….

 

Today we’re going to go through the airport step by step, learning important vocabulary and useful

Phrases along the way. Let’s imagine you’re flying from New York City to Los

Angeles.

 

Situation 1:

At the check-in desk

Agent: Good afternoon! Where are you flying to today? 

You: Los Angeles. 

Agent: May I have your passport, please?

You: Here you go.

Agent: Are you checking any bags?

You: Just this one. 

Agent: OK, please place your bag on the scale.

You: I have a stopover in Chicago – do I need to pick up my luggage there?

Agent: No, it’ll go straight through to Los Angeles. Here are your boarding passes.

Your flight leaves from gate 15A and it’ll begin boarding at 3:20. Your seat number is

26E.

You: Thanks.

Common phrases and vocabulary words:

 Instead of “Where are you flying today?” the agent may ask “What’s your final destination?” The answer will be the same!

You can say “Here you go” when you give something to somebody, as in this example when you give the passport to the agent.

Check your bags means: to put the bags on the airplane inside the cargo compartment.

The small bag you take with you on the airplane is called a carry-on. You need to put your carry-on bags through the X-ray machine at security.

The scale is the equipment that tells you the weight of your luggage. (for example, 45 kilograms)

A stopover or layover is when the airplane stops in a different city before continuing to the final destination.

If the agent says that your luggage will go straight through, it means it will go directly to the final destination and you don’t need to pick it up during your stopover.

Boarding passes are the tickets that permit you to enter the airplane.

When a plane begins boarding, it means that the passengers start to enter the plane. Usually boarding time is 30-60 minutes before takeoff (when the plane leaves)

 

Extra Tips and Suggestions:

 If you don’t know where the check-in desk is, you can ask an airport employee, “Excuse me, where is the Delta check-in desk?” or, “Excuse me, where is the American Airlines check-in desk?”

If your bag is heavier than the weight limits, or if your bag is larger than the size limits, you may need to pay an oversized baggage fee or overweight baggage fee. Some airlines in the United States also charge a fee for ALL checked bags.

If you have fragile or sensitive items in your bag that might break, you can ask the agent, “Please mark this bag as ‘fragile.’”

If you want to ask if the flight will leave at the correct time, you can say, “Is the flight on time?” The agent will respond either “Yes” if the flight is on the correct schedule, or “There’s a 20-minute delay” (for example) if the flight will leave later than expected.

Extra questions in the U.S.

On flights going to or inside the U.S., you will probably be asked some extra security questions before or during check-in. Here are some sample questions and the correct responses:

Agent: Did you pack your bags yourself?

You: Yes.

Agent: Are you carrying any firearms or flammable materials?

You: No.

Agent: Has your luggage been in your possession at all times?

You: Yes.

*Be careful here – some agents ask if your luggage has been “in your possession at all times” and others ask if your luggage has been “outside your supervision (or possession) at any time.” The answer to the first question is YES and the answer to the second question would be NO.

Agent: Has anyone given you anything to carry on the flight?

You: No.

Agent: Are you aware of the regulations regarding liquids in your carry-on, which must be 3.4 ounces or less and placed inside a single quart-sized transparent plastic bag?

You: Yes.

* If you want to take any liquids on a flight in the United States, they must be 3.4 ounces (100 milliliters) or less and you must put them all in a clear (transparent) plastic bag. Each passenger can take only one bag on the plane. If you have bigger bottles of liquid (like shampoo, wine, etc.) you need to put them into your checked bag.

 

Situation 2:

Going through security

 

There are two pieces of equipment in security: you put your bags through the X-ray machine, and you walk through the metal detector. The X-ray machine has a conveyor belt that moves your bags automatically through the machine. You can put small items like keys or money into plastic bins. 

Agent: Please lay your bags flat on the conveyor belt, and use the bins for small objects.

You: Do I need to take my laptop out of the bag? 

Agent: Yes, you do. Take off your hat and your shoes, too. 

(You walk through the metal detector) 

[BEEP BEEP BEEP BEEP] 

Agent: Please step back. Do you have anything in your pockets – keys, cell phone, and loose change?

You: I don’t think so. Let me try taking off my belt. 

Agent: Okay, come on through. 

(You go through the metal detector again) 

Agent: You’re all set! Have a nice flight.

The phrase “you’re all set” is a common expression that means “you’re finished and everything is OK.”

Phrasal Verb focus:

SET OFF and GO OFF

When the alarm sounds, we say “the alarm went off.” To describe what caused the alarm to sound, we say “set off” – for example, “My keys set off the alarm” or “My keys set off the metal detector.”

Situation 3:

At the gate

Airports are divided into terminals (the major sections of the airport) and each terminal has many gates. The gate is the door you go through to enter the airplane.

Here are a few announcements you might hear while you are at the gate, waiting for the plane to board.

“Attention passengers of United Airlines flight 880. There has been a gate change. United Airlines flight 880 will now be leaving from gate 12.”

Travel Tip:

Know your flight number in English, so that you can pay attention to the announcement and know if you need to go to a different gate.

“United Airlines flight 880 to Miami is now boarding.” (This means it’s time for passengers to enter the plane)

“We would like to invite our first- and business-class passengers, Star Club Premium members, and passengers requiring special assistance to board at gate 12.” (This means that passengers who are “special” (first class, business class, or in the Star Club) or passengers who are elderly (old), disabled, pregnant, or with small children can go into the airplane first.)

“We would now like to invite all passengers seated in Zone 2 – that’s rows 16 -35 – to begin boarding United Airlines flight 880 at gate 12.” (Look at your boarding pass to know your “zone number” and what “row” your seat number is)  

“We would now like to invite all passengers to board United Airlines flight 880 to Miami at gate 12.”

 (This means everyone can enter the plane)

“This is the last call for United Airlines flight 880 to Miami, now boarding at gate number 12.”

 (This means it is the FINAL OPPORTUNITY to enter the plane before they close the doors)

“Passenger John Smith. Passenger John Smith, please proceed to the United Airlines desk at gate 12.”

 (Sometimes the announcement will call a specific passenger by name. The word “proceed” in this context is a formal way to say “go.”)

Situation 4:

On the plane 

The people who work inside the airplane serving food and drinks are called flight attendants. Both men and women who have this job are called flight attendants. Here’s a conversation you might have on the plane.

Flight attendant: Chicken or pasta?

You: Sorry?

Flight attendant: Would you like chicken or pasta?  

You: I’ll have the chicken. 

Flight attendant: Anything to drink? 

You: What kind of soda do you have? 

Flight attendant: Coke, Diet Coke, Sprite, Orange, and Dr. Pepper. 

You: A Diet Coke, no ice, please.

Flight attendant: Here you go.

You: Thanks. 

Conversation Tips:

 If you didn’t understand what the flight attendant said, you can say

Sorry? Or Pardon? To ask him or her to repeat it.

 If you want to ask for something, you can use the phrase “Can I have…” For example: Can I have a blanket? 

Can I have a pair of headphones? (Or: Can I have a headset?) Can I have some water? Can I have some extra napkins? Can I have a decaf coffee? 

There are two types of coffee: regular coffee, which has caffeine. This is the type of coffee that helps keep you awake. There is also Decaf coffee – this is short for “decaffeinated coffee” – and this type has no caffeine. It’s good to drink decaf coffee if you like the taste of coffee, but you want to go to sleep soon.

Finally, if you need to stand up, but there is a person sitting between you and the aisle, you can say Excuse me and make a motion to start standing up. The person sitting next to you will understand and stand up to let you get out of your seat.